Alumni

Dr Heather Johnston (2016)

We were delighted to welcome Dr Heather Johnston back into the group in 2015 after she had a brief period working for the Edinburgh Pharma Division of Exova. Heather worked on a collaborative project between the Hulme and Barlow groups funded by the Leverhulme Trust, which was aimed at investigating the interactions of specific proteins in the complement system. Heather developed the synthesis of novel robust SAMs for use in SPR and AFM studies. On leaving the group, Heather went to a second postdoc position working in the group of Dr Julie Welburn in the School of Biological Sciences at Edinburgh before securing a position with Sygnature Discovery in Nottingham as a Senior Scientist.

Faye Cruickshank (PhD 2016)

Faye Cruickshank (MChem Hons in Medicinal and Biological Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in Sept 2011. She was funded by Cancer Research UK as part of the EaStCHEM Cancer Medicinal Chemistry training programme, and developed new techniques and phases for affinity chromatography to use in “click” chemistry applications. Her project was directed at the identification of weak-binding interactors of small molecules such as anisomycin (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 2014) and fingolimod to elucidate their role as possible cancer therapeutics. After leaving the group Faye was recruited to work in the mass spectrometry service within the School of Chemistry at The University of Edinburgh.

Alex Saunders (PhD 2016)

Alex Saunders (MChem Hons Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in September 2011. His project was jointly funded by Cancer Research UK and the EPSRC, and he investigated medicinal chemistry applications of the Copper Alkyne-Azide Cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reaction. As part of his project Alex targeted the development of new methods for “stapling” peptide inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction. On leaving the group Alex joined Almac near Belfast as a Discovery Chemist.

Dr Vincent Gauchot (2015)

Dr Vincent Gauchot joined the group from his PhD with Prof. Andreea R. Schmitzer at the University of Montreal, Canada, via a brief postdoc in the Shaver group. His research focused on the development of novel enzyme/pro-chromophore systems for use in histological staining in collaboration with the Horsfall group at Edinburgh and Leica Biosystems. On leaving the group, Vincent went to a postdoc position working in the group of Dr Ai-Lan Lee in the School of Chemistry at Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh.

Sarah Thomas (PhD 2015)

Sarah Thomas (MChem Hons in Medicinal and Biological Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in September 2009. Her PhD was funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and involved developing new synthetic tools and analytical methods for the study of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions. Sarah also held the first Postgraduate Development Scholarship in Public Engagement in the School of Chemistry. Sarah presented her research work at the 16th European Carbohydrate Symposium (Sorrento, 2011), the 40th Scottish Organic Regional Meeting (Strathclyde, 2011), the RSC/BiochemSoc meeting “Carbohydrate analysis and glycomics: where next?” (London, 2012) and the 26th International Carbohydrate Symposium (Madrid, 2012). Sarah also presented “Glowing Diagnosis”, “CSI at the Museum” and “The Energy Challenge” Workshops at the Dunbar Science Festival and Edinburgh International Science Festival, and took part in a number of public engagement activities for CRUK. Sarah was awarded the University of Edinburgh 2013 Sir William Darling Memorial Prize for her engagement work, and her Glowing Diagnosis workshop was nominated for the Royal Society of Edinburgh Innovators Prize for Public Engagement in 2013. Sarah now works for the Edinburgh International Science Festival as an Events Developer.

Nicolas Petitjean (PhD 2015)

Nicolas Petitjean (Chem Eng Dip & MSc Organic Chemistry, Strasbourg, France) joined the group in September 2007. His interest in the interface between biology and chemistry led him to the four-year Cancer Medicinal Chemistry training programme funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) at the University of Edinburgh. In his first year at Edinburgh he gained an MSc (Res) in Life Sciences and he carried out three projects related to cancer, working with Prof. Ted Hupp, Dr Michael Greaney and Prof. Kathryn Ball. Nicolas started his PhD in September 2008 working on the discovery and development of inhibitors of the oncogenic protein MDM2 in collaboration with Prof. Kathryn Ball from the Cell Signalling Unit at the Edinburgh Cancer Research UK Centre. Following the discovery of a 12-mer peptide able to inhibit the ubiquitination of p53 by MDM2, he developed cy”click” peptoid-peptide hybrid derivatives of this peptide. Nicolas presented his work at the CHI Drug Discovery Chemistry conference (San Diego, 2010) and the 12th Tetrahedron Symposium (Sitges, 2011). After finishing his PhD Nico gained a chemistry position in a start-up company in Nancy, France. After leaving the group Nicolas joined the chemical company YpsoFacto in Nancy, France.

Heather Johnston (PhD 2014)

Heather Johnston (MChem Hons in Chemistry with Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University) joined the group in September 2010. She was funded by the EPSRC and CRUK, and worked on the total synthesis of bisebromoamide (ChemBioChem, 2016) and a number of analogues for SAR and affinity chromatography studies. As part of her project she developed new stereocontrolled routes to several of the novel amino acid components of this natural product, including α-methyl cysteine (Synlett, 2013), 4-methyl proline (Org. Lett., 2014) and bromo-tyrosine (Molecules, 2016). Heather presented her work at the 12th Tetrahedron Symposium (Sitges, 2011), the 13th Tetrahedron Symposium (Amsterdam, 2012), the 6th Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Symposium for Postgraduates (Cambridge, 2012), the XXII National Meeting on Medicinal Chemistry (Rome, 2013), the RSC Protein and Peptide Science Group Early Stage Researcher Meeting (Durham, 2013), the 42nd Scottish Regional Meeting of the RSC Organic Division Meeting (Heriot-Watt, 2013) and at International Postgraduate Meeting J-NOST 10 (Chennai, 2014). After leaving the group Heather joined the Edinburgh Pharma Division of Exova as a graduate analyst.

Kevin Ralston (PhD 2014)

Kevin Ralston (BSc Hons Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in 2009 on the 4-year EaStCHEM Cancer Medicinal Chemistry training programme funded by Cancer Research UK (CRUK). In his first year he carried out three cancer-related projects under the supervision of Dr. Richard Meehan, Dr. Michael Greaney and Dr. Alison Hulme and gained an MSc (Res) in Biomedical Sciences. Kevin started his PhD in September 2010 and his research focused on the synthesis of the antitubulin polyketide disorazole C1 (Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed., 2015) and its analogues using Evans-Tishchenko (Synthesis, 2012) and ring-closing alkyne metathesis reactions as key coupling steps in the synthesis. Kevin presented his work at the RSC 22nd International Symposium: Synthesis in Organic Chemistry (Cambridge, 2011), the 13th Tetrahedron Symposium (Amsterdam, 2012) and the 14th Tetrahedron Symposium (Vienna, 2013). On leaving the group Kevin joined Lloyds Bank.

Emily McHale (MSc 2014)

Emily McHale (MChem Hons Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry, St Andrews University) joined the group in September 2012 to work on a project sponsored by UCB investigating the effects of peptide stapling on the intrinsically disordered protein aSyn. On leaving the group, Emily took up a PhD position in Norway working jointly at the Museum of Cultural Heritage and Department of Chemistry at the University of Oslo, as part of the Saving Oseberg Project.

Dr Clinton Ramstadius (2013)

Dr Clinton Ramstadius completed his undergraduate studies in chemical engineering at the Royal Institute of Technology (RIT), Stockholm, Sweden in November 2005. His diploma thesis in chemical engineering which he undertook at at AstraZeneca, Process R&D (Södertälje, Sweden) was entitled “Investigation of the Palladium-catalysed Cyanation of Aryl Halides”. Clinton gained his Licentiate of Engineering under the supervision Dr. Ian Cumpstey (Stockholm University, Sweden) in February 2009 and he gained his PhD working in the same group in December 2010 with a thesis titled “Synthesis of Carbohydrate Mimics and the Development of a Carbohydrate Epimerisation Method”. After a brief sabbatical, Clinton worked for a year as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate in “Chemistry of Plant Polysaccharides and Biocomposites”, at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden (with Assoc. Prof. Qi Zhou, Division of Glycoscience). Clinton joined the Hulme group in September 2012 on a prestigious Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship working on the synthesis and evaluation of the antitubulin poyketide disorazole C1 (Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed., 2015) and its analogues. On leaving the group Clinton joined Cambrex Karlskoga (Sweden), an innovative life sciences company focusing on the development of small molecule therapeutics.

Dr Anne Germeroth (2013)

Dr Anne Germeroth joined us as a 6 month PDRA funded by the Wellcome Trust after completing her PhD in the Arnold group at Edinburgh in January 2013. Anne’s research was focused on the development of biotinidase-resistant MR imaging probes (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013) for use in pre-targeted imaging of inflamation and was jointly supervised by Dr Patrick Hadoke in the British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science. After leaving the group Anne returned to her native Germany to begin training as a patent lawyer in Munich.

Lore Troalen (PhD 2013)

Lore Troalen joined the group in January 2009, on a 3 year secondment from the National Museums Scotland (NMS) Conservation and Analytical Research Department. Lore gained her Maîtrise de Chimie Organique from University of Sciences Paris XI, Orsay in 2001, and further (MSc & MPhil level) qualifications in Archaeo Materials Science from the University of Bordeaux in 2002 & 2003. Lore’s research work focused on the development of new techniques (including UPLC and PIXE) for the study of dyestuffs (Anal. Methods, 2014) and mordants on textiles and ethnographic materials (Microchem J., 2016) and was funded by the Science and Heritage Programme. Her project allowed her to work with early English tapestries from the Burrell Collection (Glasgow) and the Bodleian Library (Oxford), as well as quillwork which forms part of the Native American collection at NMS. Lore presented her work at the 42nd IUPAC Congress (Glasgow, 2009), the 29th and 31st Dyes in History and Archaeology Meetings (Lisbon, 2010; Antwerp 2012), the Glasgow Museums Annual Conference (2009) and the Science and Heritage Programme Collaborative Research Studentship Symposium (Oxford, 2010). After her PhD Lore returned to NMS where she leads the Analytical Science section of Collections Services.

Helen Niblock (PhD 2012)

Helen Niblock (MChem Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of York) joined the group in September 2008. She came with two years experience of working in a medicinal chemistry environment, from her industrial placement at GSK and a further year at Cellzome (Cambridge) after graduation. Helen’s studentship was affiliated with the CRUK Medicinal Chemistry training centre, and her PhD research focused on the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel disorazole C1 analogues (Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed., 2015). Helen presented her work at RSC 21st International Symposium: Synthesis in Organic Chemistry (Oxford, 2009), the RSC Challenges in Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (ISACS1) (San Francisco, 2010) and the 12th Tetrahedron Symposium (Sitges, 2011). After her PhD, Helen moved to a postdoctoral position with Prof. Steve Davies at the University of Oxford to work on a CRUK-funded medicinal chemistry programme; she is now a Manager with the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Sarah Boys (PhD 2012)

Sarah Boys (MChem Hons in Medicinal and Biological Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in July 2007. She developed new synthetic routes (Molecules, 2016) for the synthesis of propargyl-tagged tyrosine derivatives which she incorporated into peptide leads generated through phage display and also the NRPS natural product bisebromoamide (ChemBioChem, 2016), to enable “click”-based investigations into their biological targets. Sarah presented her work at 10th Tetrahedron Symposium (Paris, 2009), the RSC Bioorganic Postgraduate Meeting (Leeds, 2009) and RSC Challenges in Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (ISACS1) (San Francisco, 2010). Sarah was also selected to present her work at the highly prestigious Pfizer/RSC postgraduate poster competition (London, 2009). On leaving the group Sarah joined Synergy Health.

Jill Hanna (PhD 2011)

Jill Hanna (BSc Hons Chemistry, University College Cork, Ireland) joined the group in August 2007. She was an EST Marie Curie Fellow working on the design of luminescent sensors for the detection of copper(I) in biological systems and she successfully improved our sensor signal output from 10-fold to >80-fold. As a side-project she began work on the group’s biotinidase-resistant magnetic resonance imaging agents (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013) and her work is the subject of a patent application. Jill presented her sensor work at the 11th Belgian Organic Synthesis Symposium (Ghent, 2008) and at the RSC Bioorganic Postgraduate Symposium (Leeds, 2009) where she won the poster prize. She also attended the “Roche Continents” Arts and Science Festival (Salzburg, 2008). After completion of her PhD, Jill took up a position with P&G in Newcastle working in Product Research.

Felicetta Landi (PhD 2011)

Felicetta Landi (Laurea in Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Italy) joined the group in August 2007 having completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Salerno. Felicia was an EST Marie Curie Fellow and while in the group she developed a new cleavable “click” linker for affinity chromatography applications (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2010). Felicia also worked on the synthesis of several tagged variants of cytotoxic natural products, including octalactin A, anisomycin and bisebromoamide (Org. Lett., 2014). Felicia presented her work at the 11th Belgian Organic Synthesis Symposium (Ghent, 2008), at the RSC Bioorganic Postgraduate Symposium (Leeds, 2009) and at the RSC Challenges in Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (ISACS1) (San Francisco, 2010). Felicia now works in Product Research for P&G in Brussels.

Philip Dorgan (PhD 2010)

Philip Dorgan (BSc Hons Chemistry, University College Cork, Ireland) joined the Hulme group in September 2006 having completed his undergraduate studies at University College Cork. He was an EST Marie Curie Fellow and the recipient of a CASE award from Lilly working on the synthesis of the antitubulin polyketide disorazole C1. As part of his project Philip developed the heteroaryl Evans-Tishchenko reaction (J. Org. Chem., 2010) for use in the synthesis of analogues of this natural product. Philip presented a poster on his work at the 8th Tetrahedron Symposium (Berlin, 2007) and attended the Ischia Advanced School of Organic Chemistry (Naples, 2008). After graduating from the group, Philip took up a position with P&G in Product Research in Newcastle.

Dr Odile Meyer (2009)

Dr Odile Meyer graduated with a 5-year-university degree DEA in Molecular and Supramolecular Organic Chemistry in 2001 at the University Louis Pasteur of Strasbourg (France). She studied for her PhD (2001-2004) in the Laboratoire de Chimie et Biochimie des Microorganismes at University Louis Pasteur of Strasbourg (France) under the direction of Prof. Michel Rohmer and Dr Catherine Grosdemange-Billiard. Odile then spent one year as postdoctoral fellow in the Organisch-Chemisches Institut at the University of Zürich (Switzerland) in Prof. John A. Robinson’s group. After her postdoc, she obtained a temporary assistant professor position (ATER) and she joined the group of Prof. Andrew Griffiths in the Institut de Science et d’Ingénierie Supramoléculaires (ISIS) in Strasbourg (France). She worked on a collaborative project between the laboratories of Professors Andrew Griffiths and Jean-Marie Lehn. She joined the Hulme group in January 2007. Odile worked on the synthetic dual functionalisation of heparin-derived saccharides for FRET studies (Mol. BioSyst., 2008) and she developed a number of new fluorescent “click” ligands which have since been used by the group in the design of new copper(I) sensors. On leaving the group, Odile took a position as a teacher in a secondary school in Strasbourg (France) while raising her young family.

Lauren Donaldson (PhD 2009)

Lauren Donaldson (MChem Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in October 2004 as an MChem project student working on a Heck mediated approach to the tagging of glycosaminoglycans. Lauren then returned to the group to undertake her PhD on a GSK-sponsored CASE award in September 2005, working on new approaches towards the synthesis of phenanthridines (Tetrahedron, 2008) and their development using ring rearrangement metathesis (Synlett, 2009) and dihydroxylation reactions to give a library of compounds which were tested in zebrafish assays (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011). Lauren was a recipient of an SCI Messel Scholarship from 2005-2008. Lauren presented a poster of her work at the RSC 20th International Symposium on Organic Chemistry (Cambridge, 2007) and was selected in an international competition to attend the 2007 “Roche Continents” Arts and Science Festival (Salzburg, 2007). On leaving the group she spent six months travelling before starting work as a medical writer with Synergy Vision in London.

Dr Emiliano Gemma (2008)

Dr Emiliano Gemma carried out his undergraduate studies in Parma, graduating in 2000. During his final year project, he worked under the supervision of Prof. R. Ungaro and Prof. A. Casnati working on the synthesis of calixarene-based ligands for Gd(III), within a project aimed at the development of new MRI contrast agents. In March 2001 he moved to Stockholm, to join the group of Prof. S. Oscarson at Stockholm University as a PhD student. Emiliano had a fellowship from Glycotrain, a EU-funded network comprising leading European labs within the glycobiology field. In May 2005, he obtained his PhD after defending his thesis entitled: “Synthesis of oligosaccharides for interaction studies with various lectins”. In December 2005 he was appointed as an EPSRC-funded PDRA in the Hulme group and in December 2006 he was appointed to a prestigious Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship. Emiliano’s research project was focussed on the synthetic functionalisation of glycosaminoglycans (Chem. Commun., 2007) for NMR footprinting studies (Mol. BioSyst., 2008). Emiliano presented his work at the 14th European Carbohydrate Symposium (Lubeck, 2007) and at the 24th Carbohydrate Symposium (Oslo, 2008). On leaving the group, Emiliano took some time out to do voluntary work before taking up a position as a Manufacturing Technician at Piramal LifeSciences Ltd in Falkirk, Scotland.

Sandra Fanjul (PhD 2008)

Sandra Fanjul (Licenciado Organic Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Spain) completed her undergraduate studies in 2001 and went on to work on a collaborative project between the University of Oviedo and Asturiana de Zinc. She then spent two and half years working in a chemical company before joining the Hulme group in September 2004. Sandra worked on the development of new methodology for the asymmetric aldol reaction, including the development of a readily cleavable thiol auxiliary for anti aldol (Org. Lett., 2006) and glycolate aldol (J. Org. Chem., 2008) reactions. She presented a poster of her work at the 34th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (Strathclyde, 2005), and gave an oral presentation of her work at the the 18th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (Heriot Watt, 2006). Sandra gave an oral presentation on her work at the 234th ACS National Meeting (Boston, 2007). Sandra carried out a brief postdoctoral appointment within the group before leaving to join RSC Publishing as a Technical Editor.

Iain Inverarity (PhD 2007)

Iain Inverarity (MChem Hons Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group as a project student in 2002 before returning as a PhD student in October 2003. Iain’s PhD was in collaboration with Prof. Philip Cohen at the University of Dundee and involved the synthesis of marked anisomycin analogues that could be readily transformed into fluorescent (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2007) and biotinylated molecular probes using the “click” reaction (Bioconj. Chem., 2007). Iain presented posters at the 7th International Symposium on Bioorganic Chemistry (Sheffield, 2004), the RSC Bioorganic Chemistry Meeting (Leeds, 2004) and the RSC Postgraduate Industry Tour (Newcastle, 2005 – 1st prize). Iain also gave oral presentations of his work at the RSC Bioorganic Chemistry Meeting (Southampton, 2005 – joint 1st prize), the 17th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (Dundee, 2006 – 1st prize), and the 232nd National ACS Meeting (San Francisco, 2006). After leaving the group, Iain joined GSK at their Montrose site for 6 months before moving to Brussels to work for P&G in Product Research.

Nina Dobrovinskaya (PhD 2007)

Nina Dobrovinskaya (MSc Pharmacy, St-Petersburg Chemical Pharmaceutical Academy, Russia) joined the group in October 2003 having completed her undergraduate studies in St-Petersburg. Nina worked on an asymmetric aldol based approach to the total synthesis of the aminopolyol antibiotic zwittermicin A, developed a highly efficient synthesis of the non-proteinaceous amino acid albizziine (Synlett, 2008) , and conducted preliminary studies on the use of high pressure conditions for catalytic asymmetric glycolate aldol reactions. Nina presented posters on her work at the RSC European Postgraduate Industry study tour (2005) and at the RSC 19th International Symposium on Synthesis in Organic Chemistry (Oxford, 2005). Nina has joined Charles River Laboratories in Edinburgh as a Quality Assurance Auditor.

Dr Romain Viguier (2006)

Dr Romain Viguier (PhD, University of Grenoble, France) joined the Hulme group in March 2004 as a BBSRC-funded PDRA to study the mechanism of activation of the SAPK pathways by anisomycin (Bioconj. Chem., 2007). In 2006 he held a temporary Lectureship in Organic Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh where he began the development of lanthanide-based Cu(I) sensors for live-cell imaging (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2006). For his Ph.D., he studied lanthanide complexation in aqueous solution with Profs. G. Serratrice & C. Dupuy at the University of Grenoble, France. His first postdoc was with Prof. T. Gunnlaugsson at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of the phospho-diester bond in HPNP by charged lanthanide complexes, as a model for RNase activity. Subsequently, in Newcastle with Dr. A. Houlton and Prof. B. A. Connolly he worked on the design and synthesis of lanthanide complexes as models for DNase. Romain presented his work on the anisomycin project at the 230th ACS National Meeting (Washington DC, 2005) and won first prize for his poster presentation on Cu(I) sensors at the Organon Symposium (Glasgow, 2006). After undertaking a Scottish Enterprise / Royal Society of Edinburgh Enterprise Fellowship within the School of Chemistry at Edinburgh, Romain set-up his own company Herboreal Ltd which provides high quality rare phytochemicals and derivatives for R&D purposes.

John White (PhD 2006)

John White (MChem Hons Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in October 2002. John successfully completed the synthesis of the backbone of the cytotoxic marine natural product octalactin A (Org. Lett., 2007), exploiting the high diastereoselectivity of the Evans-Tishchenko reaction as a fragment coupling strategy, and combining it with a high yielding Grubbs II-catalysed RCM reaction for the synthesis of the medium ring lactone. John also developed a new norephedrine-derived thiol auxiliary which shows high diastereoselectivity in anti aldol reactions and is readily displaced by a range of mild nucleophiles (Org. Lett., 2006). John presented posters at the RSC 5th International Symposium on Transition Metals in Organic Synthesis (Glasgow, 2004), the 2nd Glasgow-Organon Symposium on Synthetic Chemistry (Glasgow, 2004), the 33rd Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (St Andrews, 2004) where he won first prize; and was selected to give an oral presentation at the 16th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (Glasgow, 2005). In addition, he was selected to attend the 1st Annual Pfizer/GSK/AZ Process Development Workshop (Manchester, 2004). On leaving the group, John went to carry out postdoctoral research on (chemical) protein synthesis in the group of Dr. Stuart L. Warriner at Leeds University, where he collaborates with Prof. Sheena E. Radford on aspects of protein folding.

David Peggie (PhD 2006)

David Peggie (MChem Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in October 2002 to work as a research associate on an EC funded project involving seven partner institutions from across Europe. David was co-supervised by Prof. Hamish McNab at the University of Edinburgh, and Dr. Anita Quye at the National Museums of Scotland, whilst working on the Monitoring of Damage to Historic Tapestries (MODHT) project. David extended the work of the group in using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (Microchim. Acta, 2008), (Anal. Methods, 2014) to investigate aspects of historical textile dyestuff degradation to the neoflavonoid class of dyestuffs (Phytochemistry, 2005), and to the investigation of lesser-known historical dyestuff sources such as sawwort. He also investigated the use of ICP-MS and ICP-OES to analyse textile samples for historical mordants. David had the opportunity to work on a unique historical sample set based around tapestries from three different geographic locations (London, Madrid and Brussels) as part of the MODHT project (Dyes in History & Archaeology, 2005). David presented his work in oral and poster format at a number of conferences, including Dyes in History and Archaeology 22 (Bern, 2003), and 23 (Montpelier, 2004), the International Council of Museums Conservation Committee ICOM-CC Meeting (Amsterdam, 2005) and at the Research Centre for Textile Conservation and Textile Studies 1st Annual Conference (Southampton, 2004). On completing his PhD studies, David went to work at the National Gallery, London, as an Assistant Organic Analyst.

Kathryn Longden (MPhil 2007)

Kathryn Longden (MChem Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) carried out her Honours project in the group, before joining in October 2001 to work on a Roche Pharmaceuticals sponsored CASE award. Katy’s project involved the extension of the Hulme group Evans-Tishchenko / RCM approach, to the synthesis of ten-membered ring lactones, such as found in the cholesterol inhibitor decarestrictine D (tukolide). Katy attended the Roche Symposium (Basel, 2003), and a UK GRADschool (Oxford, 2003); she also took part in the Tomorrow’s World Roadshow (Cardiff, 2002). On leaving the group, Katy went to work as a chemical consultant with one of the world’s leading providers of global pharmaceutical market research, Genactis.

David Benstead (PhD 2005)

David Benstead (MChem Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) carried out his Honours project in the group before joining in October 2001. David (or Benny as he was known to distinguish him from the other David!) worked on an Avecia Ltd. funded project, investigating the degradation of modern inkjet dyestuffs, and was co-supervised by Prof. Hamish McNab. In the course of his research, David generated new synthetic methodology for the synthesis of functionalised hydrazides (Synlett, 2005). David attended the SCI Colour in the 21st Century Meeting (London, 2003), and a UK GRADschool (Oxford, 2003); due to the commercially sensitive nature of his research he was not able to present any posters! On completing his PhD, David undertook two shorter research projects, including the development of new analytical methods for the National Museums of Scotland, and commissioning new HPLC instrumentation for the isolation and purification of glycosaminoglycans within the Hulme group. He is now an Analytical Chemist within the Process Research group of AstraZeneca Ltd., Macclesfield.

Edward Rosser (PhD 2003)

Edward Rosser (BSc Hons Chemistry, Lancaster University) joined the group in October 1999. Ed used a glycolate aldol approach to tackle the synthesis of the pyrrolidine antibiotic anisomycin, leading to a highly efficient synthesis (Org. Lett., 2002). Ed then synthesised a number of analogues of anisomycin and, in collaboration with Prof. Philip Cohen’s group at the University of Dundee, was able to test these for the activation of the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathways (Org. Biomol. Chem., 2004). Ed attended the RSC 4th International Symposium on Transition Metals in Organic Synthesis (Leeds, 2000); presented posters at the 37th National Organic Meeting (Bozemann, Montana, 2001) and the 30th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (Glasgow, 2001); and was selected to give an oral presentation at the 14th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (St Andrews, 2002). After graduating with his PhD, Ed went to work on the development of the IUPHAR Receptor database as a postdoctoral associate in the group of Professor Anthony J. Harmar in the Division of Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh. He now works for the chemical software developers Lhasa.

Jennifer Aird (PhD 2003)

Jennifer Aird (BSc Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) carried out her Honours project in the group before joining in October 1998. Jenny was an SCI Messel Trust scholar throughout the course of her postgraduate studies. Jenny investigated ring closing metathesis reactions on some extremely challenging small and medium-ring precursors before the second generation of Grubbs catalysts were known! She carried out the first successful Evans-Tishchenko / RCM sequence to generate an unsaturated eight-membered ring lactone (Org. Lett., 2007). Jenny attended the RSC Annual Conference (Heriot Watt University, 1999), the SCI-YCP Review Meeting on Organometallics in Synthesis (London, 1999), and the 220th ACS National Meeting (Washington, 2000); and presented a poster at the 29th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (Heriot Watt, 2000) where she won first prize. Jenny gave birth to her first child in the final year of her PhD and took an extended maternity leave before returning to the group to complete her PhD studies on a part-time basis. She is now a full-time mother of three.

Ester Ferreira (PhD 2002)

Ester Ferreira (Licenciado Analytical/Organic Chemistry, Universidade Nova de Lisboa; MSc Conservation Science, De Montfort University) joined the group in January 1998. Ester’s research was supported by the Portuguese government and Ester was co-supervised by Dr. Hamish McNab, at the University of Edinburgh, and Dr. Anita Quye, at the National Museums of Scotland. Ester carried out pioneering work in the use of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry for the identification of historical natural yellow textile dyestuffs (Dyes in History & Archaeology, 2001), (Int. J. Mass Spec., 2009). She was able to determine the photodegradation products of some commonly used yellow flavonol dyestuffs (Dyes in History & Archaeology, 2002), and used this information to provenance historical textile collections (Dyes in History & Archaeology, 2003). Her thesis introduction provided a comprehensive background to the field of historical textile dyestuffs (Chem. Soc. Rev., 2004). Ester presented her work in oral and poster format at a number of conferences, including Dyes in History and Archaeology 17 (Greenwich, 1998), 18 (Brussels, 1999) and 19 (Edinburgh, 2000), the International Council of Museums Conservation Committee ICOM-CC Meeting (Lyon, 1999) and at the 13th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (Heriot Watt, 2000). After graduating with her PhD, Ester continued her research in the field of conservation with a postdoctoral appointment in the group of Prof. Jaap J. Boon at the FOM Institute for Atomic & Molecular Physics, Amsterdam, Netherlands. She now works in conservation science at the Swiss Institute of Art in Zurich.

Karren Curley (PhD 2002)

Karen Curley (BSc Hons Chemistry with Industrial Experience, University of Edinburgh) carried out her Honours project in the group before joining in October 1998. Karen investigated the Claisen reactions of N,N-dibenzyl serine-derived esters and completed the total synthesis of the iminosugar modulator CYB-3 (J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 1, 2002), as well as developing the aldol reactions of a threonine-derived ketone. Karen attended the RSC Annual Conference (Heriot Watt University, 1999); presented posters at the 220th ACS National Meeting (Washington, 2000), the Pfizer Poster Competition (London, 2000), and the 29th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (Heriot Watt, 2000); and was selected to give an oral presentation at the 12th SCI Postgraduate Meeting (Strathclyde, 2001). After graduating with her PhD, Karen went to an Industrial Postdoc with Albany Molecular Research Inc., Syracuse, USA. In 2005 she left AMRI and returned to the UK to take up a position with Edinburgh Pharmaceutical Processes Ltd.

Sarah Barron (PhD 2001)

Sarah Barron (BSc Hons Chemistry, Heriot Watt University) joined the group in October 1997 to work on a GSK-sponsored CASE award. Sarah investigated the use of the Suzuki coupling reaction to produce chiral functionalised monomers for suspension polymerisation reactions; producing chiral supported amino alcohols (Synlett, 2003) as well as supported superquat auxiliaries. Sarah attended the Palladium in Organic Synthesis Meeting (London, 1997), the 11th International Symposium on Homgeneous Catalysis (St Andrews, 1998) and the 4th International Symposium on Supported Reagents and Catalysts in Chemistry (St Andrews, 2000); and presented a poster at the 28th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (Aberdeen, 1999). On leaving the group, Sarah joined Avecia Ltd, Grangemouth where she worked from 2001-2005, before pursuing a life-long interest in Forensic Science with a Masters at the University of Strathclyde (2005-06). She now works in the Forensics Lab of Lothian and Borders Police.

Charles Montgomerie (PhD 2000)

Charles Montgomery (BSc Hons Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in October 1996 to work on the use of serine-derived aldehydes in natural product synthesis. Charlie was a C. K. Marr Educational Trust scholar throughout the course of his postgraduate studies. Charlie optimised the aldol reactions of the N,N-dibenzyl serine-derived aldehyde, and used this reaction to complete a novel approach to the total synthesis of the iminosugar modulators DAB-1 (J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 1, 2000) and nectrisine (Tetrahedron Lett., 2003). Charlie presented posters at the 12th International Conference on Organic Synthesis (Venice, 1998), the 27th Scottish Regional Perkin Meeting (St Andrews, 1998), and the Pfizer poster competition (London, 1998). When he graduated with his PhD, Charlie went to work with Albany Molecular Research Inc., Syracuse, USA, as an Industrial Postdoc.; he was subsequently hired by AMRI as a Senior Scientist.

Garnet Howells (PhD 1999)

Garnet Howells (BSc Hons Chemistry, University of Edinburgh) joined the group in October 1995 to work on the total synthesis of the cytotoxic marine polyketide, octalactin A using an intramolecular Evans-Tishchenko based approach. Garnet successfully demonstrated that the Evans-Tishchenko reaction may be carried out using beta-hydroxy enones (Tetrahedron Lett., 1997); developed the phosphonate displacement reaction of achiral thioesters (Synlett, 1998); and achieved the first synthesis of a fully functionalised octalactin seco-aldehyde. Garnet attended an EPSRC-CRAC course (York, 1997); and presented posters at the 35th National Organic Meeting (San Antonio, Texas, 1997), the Pfizer Poster Competition (London, 1997), and the 8th International Conference on Chiral Discrimination (Edinburgh, 1998). Garnet was also selected to attend the Zeneca Agrochemicals Vacation Course (1997). After graduating with his PhD, Garnet went to work for AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, UK as a Process Chemist.

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